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Overcoming the ‘Original Sin’ of Impact Investing: New Approaches to Liquidity

(Editor’s note: Some of impact investing’s most intriguing innovations in term sheets and financing structures are coming from Village Capital, a seed-stage impact fund and accelerator that has supported more than 300 entrepreneurs worldwide. Ross Baird is Vilcap’s executive director. Reposted with permission.) Last week, my friend Paul Hudnut posted a follow-up from a conversation

Living Goods: How one social enterprise is leading the fight against malaria

(Editor’s note: This piece originally appeared in The Guardian.) Mafubira, Uganda – A dose of competition is sometimes what’s required to get life-saving medicines and other needed products to urban slum dwellers and the rural poor. Drugs to treat malaria, for example, are a recurring necessity in towns like this one east of Kampala. Uganda

Unitus Makes Two Investments in India’s Workforce

India’s huge demand for skilled workers is creating compelling opportunities to invest in ventures with innovative ways to  turn low-income and marginalized people into ready workers. That’s the thesis of Unitus Seed Fund, an investor in early-stage ventures aimed at India’s “base of the pyramid” that has closed two such deals in recent weeks. Unitus

Unitus Makes Two Investments in India’s Workforce

India’s huge demand for skilled workers is creating compelling opportunities to invest in ventures with innovative ways to turn low-income and marginalized people into ready workers. That’s the thesis of Unitus Seed Fund, an investor in early-stage ventures aimed at India’s “base of the pyramid” that has closed two such deals in recent weeks. Unitus

#gpf13: Facts and Fictions of Impact Investing

(Editor’s note: I had the privilege of moderating a plenary panel at last week’s Global Philanthropy Forum with Matt Bannick of Omidyar Network, Maya Chorengel of Elevar Equity and Sasha Dichter of Acumen. Sasha provided this good summary of the themes. Reposted with permission.) The panel was an opportunity for all of us to dig

Triple Bottom Line Investing’s Prodigal Son Returns

Robert Rubinstein, a native New Yorker, is bringing his 15-year-old conference on “triple bottom-line” investing to Wall Street for the first time. “For a long time, I was reluctant to do it in the U.S.,” says Rubinstein, 61 years old, who has made his home in Amsterdam for most of the last 40 years. “Whenever

Dancing to a Disruptive Beat

If delegates have a drink for every time they hear variations on the word “disruption” at this week’s Skoll World Forum, they’ll be quite intoxicated. Indeed, many of them are — at least with their own disruptiveness. Disruption, which used to mean a trip to the principal’s office, is the coin of the realm at