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$114 billion in impact assets, third Rise Fund deal, forests as a climate solution

Greetings, ImpactAlpha readers! #Featured: ImpactAlpha Original How much money is there in impact investing? Notwithstanding all the qualifiers (we discuss in the full piece), $114 billion is the number we’ll see reported for the coming year as the size of the impact investing market. That represents the total assets of 208 asset managers and owners

Matt Damon’s Water.org secures $5 million for impact fund

Water.org’s WaterEquity subsidiary is raising its third impact fund to invest in microfinance institutions that lend to households for in-home toilets and water connections. That’s a $12 billion market globally, according to a Gates Foundation report. WaterEquity has secured $5 million in zero-interest debt from Bank of America for the planned $50 million WaterCredit Investment

Matt Damon’s Water.org secures $5 million from B of A for third impact fund

Water.org’s WaterEquity subsidiary is raising its third impact fund to invest in microfinance institutions that lend to households for in-home toilets and water connections. That’s a $12 billion market globally, according to a Gates Foundation report. WaterEquity has secured $5 million in zero-interest debt from Bank of America for the planned $50 million WaterCredit Investment

Water takes its place as a material risk — and investment opportunity

Climate Finance Banks, institutional investors and consumers are demanding companies disclose climate risks. But a related risk factor may be more pressing (and lucrative): water. A report from the U.K.-based Carbon Disclosure Project found that the impacts of droughts, floods, and water pollution cost businesses $14 billion last year — a five-fold increase from 2015. The companies in

What will business look like in the resource-scarce future?

2030 Projections about the billions of people set to join the global middle class by 2030 (it’s three billion) are often linked to estimates of growth in consumer spending (including on ImpactAlpha). But there’s a catch, says the World Resources Institute. “Current consumption patterns, even assuming efficiency improvements, put the global economy on an impossible

Circularity Capital reaches first close on new fund for, yes, the circular economy

Circularity Capital has reached the first close its new fund for, yes, the circular economy. The Edinburgh-based private equity firm is looking for transformers — companies reusing old materials and reducing waste — as well as enablers — firms that support the circular practices in other companies. Its new Circularity European Growth Fund will invest between $1.2 million and $6.2 million in

XPV Water Partners acquires Environmental Operating Solutions for wastewater decontamination

XPV Water Partners has acquired Environmental Operating Solutions for wastewater decontamination. The Toronto water investor, which manages $400 million in capital, bought all of EOSi’s business of green chemicals and services for the removal of biological contaminants in wastewater. The Cape Cod company’s carbon method, an alternative to methanol and other chemicals, is used by