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Inclusive venture capital, high-growth Ethiopian businesses, India’s electric vehicle market

Greetings, ImpactAlpha readers! #Featured: New Revivalists Brian Dixon: The 34-year-old African-American VC turning inclusion into a competitive advantage. Call it the new face of venture capital. Kapor Capital is quietly building one of the youngest, most talented and most diverse teams of venture capitalists in the industry. That team includes Brian Dixon, who at 34,

Capria fund managers expect to raise $200 million to bridge “missing middle” gap in Global South

Capital for seed-stage ventures and other small and growing businesses in emerging markets — the dreaded ‘missing middle’ — has been hard to come by. To tackle that challenge, Capria Ventures began in 2015 training and investing in a network of first-time fund managers in Latin America, Africa and Asia. Now, Capria says its network of 11 fund managers is

The California Model, financing the missing middle, nonprofit working-capital loans, CalPERS: SDGs…

Greetings, ImpactAlpha readers! #Featured: Returns on Investment Podcast The California Model: Inclusivity and shared prosperity, or exclusivity and inequality? Take a look toward the future, and often California is already there. But when it comes to innovation hubs as drivers of job creation and shared wealth, is California the model America’s second- and third-tier cities

Goodwell raises €20 million feeder fund for African impact investing

Impact Tech The Dutch firm invests in young companies focusing on financial inclusion in Africa and India PC: Goodwell Investments The Dutch firm invests in young companies focusing on financial inclusion in Africa and India. The €20 million ($24.5 million) raised from private investors is the anchor investment for its €100 million uMunthu fund, launched last year

The California Model: Inclusivity and shared prosperity or exclusivity and inequality? (podcast)

Take a look toward the future, and often California is already there. But when it comes to innovation hubs as drivers of job creation and shared wealth, is California the model America’s second- and third-tier cities really want to follow? https://medium.com/media/40415992db79ed6bb8b1e6394297ee5e/href “You’re finding germs of California happening in lots of places,” says ImpactAlpha’s David Bank, a

The Brief’s Big Nine: Data-driven, unlocking value, low-carbon banking, economic imperatives

Greetings, ImpactAlpha readers! Many investors claim to be data-driven. Except when it comes to impact. Neither limited partners nor anybody else would let fund managers get away with saying they don’t measure the financial performance of their portfolio companies. So why do LPs give venture capitalists a pass on measuring social impact? “We have to

Will demographics, automation and inequality mean the end of the middle class?

By 2030, the familiar categories of low-, middle- and upper-income in the US may be obsolete. Instead, according to a new report from Bain & Company, an affluent 20% may separate itself from the remaining 80%, who will earn less than what would be considered a middle-class income. The report calls the coming decades-long period