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Beyond Equity: Impact investors can rethink how we invest, not just what we invest in

  • Many impact investors avoid early-stage businesses because of the perceived risks.
  • My challenge to these investors, and to any limited-partner or asset manager who wants to support impactful companies, is to be open to rethinking when and how they invest, not just what they invest in,” Village Capital CEO Allie Burns writes in a guest post on ImpactAlpha.

Successful Opportunity Zone investments will pull people up, not push them out

  • "Many Opportunity Zone investors may not be so responsive to their communities, and will instead seek to change the character of a neighborhood by building luxury apartments or destination retail," writes Turner Impact Capital's Bobby Turner. "Fulfilling the spirit of the Opportunity Zone ideal means pulling people up, not pushing people out.

Private capital falls short in ‘blended finance’

  • In theory, blended finance should leverage limited public financing to “crowd in” many times that amount in private capital. In practice, such leverage has been limited, according to a Dalberg review of 117 such blended financing deals. Overall, each dollar of public funding generated only about 79 cents of private investment.

Ceniarth’s Diane Isenberg: ‘I am a gender-lens investor’

  • The $400 million family office deployed over $40 million last year in global funds and enterprises that, given the role of women in underserved rural communities, must attend to gender and power dynamics in underserved communities. “Yet, I still did not consider myself a gender-lens investor,” Isenberg writes in a guest post in ImpactAlpha. Now, she does.
  • What changed? In short, Suzanne Biegel’s Gender-Smart Investing Summit in London last year.

Boston Ujima Project is rebalancing risk, returns and power in local impact investing

ImpactAlpha, January 23 – A growing group of impact investors is distinguishing itself not simply by results of their investments, but how they are changing investing itself. The Boston Ujima Project, for example, allows community members to invest, prioritize the types of neighborhood businesses needed and vote on what gets funded. For the neighborhood investment collective,